What the convention contains

 

The Convention defines the kind of natural or cultural sites which can be considered for inscription on the World Heritage List. The Convention sets out the duties of States Parties in identifying potential sites and their role in protecting and preserving them.

By signing the Convention, each country pledges to conserve not only the World Heritage sites situated on its territory, but also to protect its national heritage.

The States Parties are encouraged to integrate the protection of the cultural and natural heritage into regional planning programmes, set up staff and services at their sites, undertake scientific and technical conservation research and adopt measures which give this heritage a function in the day-to-day life of the community.

As of September 2012, 190 States Parties have ratified the World Heritage Convention.

More information on the World Heritage Convention here:

Safe travel in Iceland
Travellers should prepare well for each trip and know its trail and route conditions.
The THING Project
The THING Project is based on the Thing sites that are the assembly sites spread across North West Europe as a result of the Viking diaspora and Norse settlements.
World heritage
Thingvellir was accepted on the World Heritage list for its cultural values in 2004 at World Heritage Committee meeting in China.
Protection and management
Thingvellir National Park was designated by a special law on the protection of the area, passed by the Alþing on 7th May, 1928.